Human Rights Index #37

The latest Human Rights Index #37 (focused on US-based sex-trafficking) has now been posted on The Iowa Review website: http://iowareview.uiowa.edu/page/human_rights_index.

TLCP Call for Submissions – Spring 2013

Transnational Law and Contemporary Problems is accepting article submissions for publication in its upcoming volume. TLCP is an international and comparative law journal that publishes articles addressing issues and problems transcending national and political boundaries. Submissions should be made in electronic format (preferably Word or PDF format). Citations should follow the rules published in The Bluebook: A Uniform System of Citation (19th ed. 2010).

If you have any further questions about submitting articles or symposia topics, please direct any inquiries to tlcp@uiowa.edu.

Privacy and Google: Trouble in the European Union

By Dana Judas, Student Writer

Note: The views expressed in blog posts are solely those of the authors. The opinions contained do not necessarily reflect those of TLCP or the University of Iowa.

Every morning I wake up, stretch, and grab my laptop. While my start-up screen loads up with my homepage, I reach over and check my Android phone for texts and emails. Within ten minutes of waking, I’m already using multiple Google products before I’ve even jumped out of bed to shower. It’s automatic by this point. I wouldn’t even think to use anything else. From a simple search, to translating a word, or finding a restaurant, there isn’t much a user can’t use Google for. Not only does it provide fast and reliable search results, its maps and directions are a thing of beauty when I’m lost in the winding streets of London without a prayer. It’s easy, aesthetically pleasing, and is now the familiar friend I look to when I need an answer and I need it right now. Other search products, such as Bing or Yahoo, are laughable in comparison—their interfaces clunky and foreign to my now well-trained Google eyes. I depend on its reliability to find articles, check flight prices, and intuitively know what sites and services are going to pique my interest. Read the rest of this entry »

The Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement May Have Negative Impact On U.S. Agricultural Exports

By Jacob Burgers, Student Writer

Note: The views expressed in blog posts are solely those of the authors. The opinions contained do not necessarily reflect those of TLCP or the University of Iowa.

The Trans-Pacific Partnership (“TPP”) agreement is a free trade deal currently being negotiated between eleven countries.[1] The TPP has been described as one of the most ambitious free trade agreements ever attempted.[2] President Obama has been a staunch supporter of the agreement as a part of his promise to increase American exports.[3] The TPP is expected to substantially reduce tariffs among the countries privy to the agreement, and help open up trade in goods and services.[4] The agreement is also viewed as a catalyst to a closer relationship in economic policies and regulatory issues among the countries involved.[5] While there remain significant issues that need to be resolved, the TPP has been pushed—in large part by President Obama—to be finalized in the near future.[6] Read the rest of this entry »

Cyprus and the Future of the Euro

By Dana Judas, Student Writer

Note: The views expressed in blog posts are solely those of the authors. The opinions contained do not necessarily reflect those of TLCP or the University of Iowa.

Stepping off the train at Gare du Nord in Paris is one of life’s greatest little pleasures. Coming from the cold, dark, and rainy English weather, the 20 degree higher temperatures of France’s capital city was a relief. As my niece and I made our way to the sortie (exit), I thought it would be best to grab a bottle of water. After all, the Métro ride would take about half an hour, and I’d forgotten to buy one before we embarked from St. Pancras more than two hours ago. Read the rest of this entry »

Active Defense Against Cyberattacks

By Jacob Burgers, Student Writer

Note: The views expressed in blog posts are solely those of the authors. The opinions contained do not necessarily reflect those of TLCP or the University of Iowa.

In today’s economic climate, U.S. businesses face a number of threats—sequestration, liquidity in capital markets, and uncertainty in taxes to name a few—but one of the newest threats comes from digital malefactors. As more and more information is available online, businesses are able to transact quicker than ever before, but at the same time having valuable information online creates a risk exposure never seen before. Digital hackers continue to raid U.S. businesses for valuable corporate secrets, and there are questions surrounding the extent at which these businesses can protect themselves against cyberattack.[1] Read the rest of this entry »

The Falkland Referendum: A Reaffirmation of British Ties

By Dana Judas, Student Writer

Note: The views expressed in blog posts are solely those of the authors. The opinions contained do not necessarily reflect those of TLCP or the University of Iowa.

On March 11, the Falkland Islands held a referendum on whether or not to remain a British Overseas Territory. In an almost unanimous result, the small island voted in favor of maintaining political, economic, and cultural ties with the mother country. The result, however, has led Argentinian President Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner to declare that the country does not recognize the vote as legitimate, insisting that the vote does not carry any legal validity.[1] British Prime Minister David Cameron hailed the vote as “the clearest possible result.”[2] Cameron added that, “the most important thing about this result is that we believe in self-determination, and the Falkland Islanders have spoken so clearly about their future, and now other countries right across the world, I hope, will respect and revere this very, very clear result.”[3] Read the rest of this entry »

Book Review – Ike’s Bluff

David Hosack, Student Writer, has written a brief review of Ike’s Bluff: President Eisenhower’s Secret Battle to Save the World (2012) by Evan Thomas. For the full review, click below to read the rest of the entry.

Note: The views expressed in blog posts are solely those of the authors. The opinions contained do not necessarily reflect those of TLCP or the University of Iowa.

Introduction

Ike’s Bluff, written by journalist Evan Thomas and released in 2012, is not a full biography of former general and president Dwight D. Eisenhower. Though it references both Eisenhower’s time before and after his tenure in office (with particular emphasis on his achievements as Supreme Commander of the allied forces in Europe during World War II), the book focuses on Eisenhower in the White House, with a special focus on his handling of the developing Cold War and arms race between the Soviet Union and the United States. Thomas challenges the idea of Eisenhower as a semi-retired president, working more on his golf game than improving the country. Instead, Thomas presents Eisenhower the strategist, ever predicting and responding to the moves of his adversary, fully cognizant of the stakes of peace and nuclear war. Proving its relevance today, the book provides fitting lessons for world leaders in their response to the complexities of living in a nuclear age.  Read the rest of this entry »

The Party’s Over: Reforming Libor

By Samuel Konchar, Student Writer

Note: The views expressed in blog posts are solely those of the authors. The opinions contained do not necessarily reflect those of TLCP or the University of Iowa.

The financial crisis of 2008 is a devastating reminder that we live in heavily globalized world, particularly in international finance. The shake of the U.S. markets at home were felt in Europe and Japan, as global banks such as Bear Stearns and Lehman Brothers collapsed. Amidst heavy risk, banks fought to stay afloat, trying to reassure investors of their financial viability. Of particular importance was the ability of banks to borrow money. Recently, it has come to light that banks were rigging a primary financial benchmark while the financial world was on the brink. Read the rest of this entry »

It’s Time

By Dana Judas, Student Writer

Note: The views expressed in blog posts are solely those of the authors. The opinions contained do not necessarily reflect those of TLCP or the University of Iowa.

On February 5, 2012, the House of Commons passed a proposal to allow same-sex couples to marry in religious ceremonies. With 400 Members of Parliament (“MPs”) in favor of the bill and only 175 against, the vote represents an historical shift in thinking within British politics.[1] Currently, gay and lesbian couples are only allowed to be married under a civil partnership. While it will be up to particular religious institutions to decide whether to perform the ceremonies, the law will no longer hold back couples who want to not only be married in a civil ceremony, but in a religious one as well. The bill would not force religious institutions to begin performing same-sex marriages against their wishes; however, it would eliminate the current legal prohibition of same-sex marriages within religious institutions. The bill would also allow same-sex couples who have previously married under a civil partnership to legally convert their partnership into a marriage.[2] Read the rest of this entry »

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