Moser, ’77, becomes 126th president of Iowa State Bar Association


Cynthia C. Moser, ’77, Sioux City, Iowa, assumed the presidency of The Iowa State Bar Association (ISBA) in June.

She is the 126th president of the nearly 8,200-member association, and the third woman in the 138-year-old organization’s history to hold the top leadership position. ISBA presidents serve a one-year term.

Born in Belmond and raised most of her life in Kanawha and Orange City, Moser and her husband, Dan, moved to Sioux City in 1979 where she practiced law with the Berenstein, Moore, Moser, Berenstein & Heffernan firm. She joined the Heidman Law Firm in 1998 where she is a partner.

Her interests in art, gardening and interior design have shaped her involvement in the Sioux City community she proudly calls home. She served six years on the Sioux City Art Center Board of Trustees, and two separate stints on the Sioux City Art Center Association Board, a private non-profit fundraising arm of the Sioux City Art Center, as well as on the board of Friends of KWIT-KOJI/FM-90.

In addition, she serves on the board and chairs the Academic Affairs Committee of Morningside College. She also has been heavily involved with the Mercy Foundation and a number of Mercy Medical Center organizations such as Women’s Night Out and the Child Advocacy Center.

Moser, in her inaugural address to the nearly 250 individuals attending the ceremony, outlined the goals she hopes to accomplish during her presidential year.

“My primary goal is to assure that the ISBA remains relevant to its membership and honors its rich legacy as the foremost legal professional organization in the state,” she said. Even though the legal profession is in the midst of a dramatic transformation and is likely never to see the glory days prior to the recession that began in late 2007, “we must — and will — continue to provide services that meet the evolving needs of our lawyers. To succeed in today’s new normal, lawyers need to keep abreast of the changes so they are prepared to assist, counsel and advise their clients.”

She said that she has a particular concern for the state’s newest lawyers, many of whom are leaving law school with crushing debt and little prospect of finding meaningful employment with an established law firm. She plans to work with area law schools, the Iowa Supreme Court and other interested entities “to find meaningful ways to ease the transition into practice for our young lawyers and then continue to give them the support and mentoring they will need going forward.”